Certain SPS Teachers Stand Out to Their Students

Teachers Kevin Moore, Kim Gardner, Brad Guillory, and Joe Dickens were selected by students as having the most impact on their educational careers. (photo credit: Conifer)

Teachers Kevin Moore, Kim Gardner, Brad Guillory, and Joe Dickens were selected by students as having the most impact on their educational careers. (photo credit: Conifer)

(COVINGTON, La) — Teaching methods can impact a student’s educational career. A teacher can significantly affect how well a student can learn. In an informal campus survey, students were asked which teachers taught them the most, and many different teachers were named, but four teachers seem to rise above the rest. They are Kim Gardner, Brad Guillory, Kevin Moore, and  Joe Dickens.

Teacher of American History Honors and AP American History, Gardner was described by students as extremely nice, understanding of what students want to learn, and being an awesome person in general.

“I’m honored that my students enjoy being in my class,” said Gardner upon learning she was a favorite teacher.  “I really do love my students, and I try to make my class as comfortable as I possibly can.”

Gardner hands out a unit lesson plan to Matthew Melancon in AP US History.  (Photo By: Adam Satterlee)

Kim Gardner hands out a unit lesson plan to Matthew Melancon in AP US History.
(Photo By: Adam Satterlee)

Gardner believes that she connects with her students. “I think that my students know that I respect them,” she said. Gardner states that her teaching method is to try to keep students engaged and learn beyond memorization.

English IV, Creative Writing, and AP Writing teacher Guillory was chosen because students felt that he is really funny and they like how well he relates to them.

“I’m really excited that I was picked. The whole reason I teach is to help the students. It is very fulfilling to know that my students respect me,” he said. Guillory believes that he was selected because he relates to the students. “I try to make class fun. I’m just silly.”

Guillory explains rhetorical devices to one of his AP Writing classes.   (Photo By: Adam Satterlee)

Brad Guillory explains rhetorical devices to one of his AP Writing classes. (Photo By: Adam Satterlee)

Guillory’s teaching method is to do at least three things per class so the students don’t get bored. “I can tell when a topic starts to bore the class, and I switch gears. I also try to have conversations, not just teach it.” Guillory states that he tries to keep things surreal, fun, random, and just goofy.

Teaching World History and World History Honors, Moore was chosen because students feel that he relates to them and makes class and learning fun.

“I’m very pleased that I was chosen. It is always nice to be reassured in what I’m doing,” Moore said. “I think that I was chosen because I am interesting, colorful, creative, fun, outgoing, spirited, and easy going.”

Kevin Moore guides his World History class  for a Power Point project.  ( Photo By: Adam Satterlee)

Kevin Moore guides his World History class for a Power Point project.
( Photo By: Adam Satterlee)

Moore’s teaching method is to be sporadic, open, freelanced, and relaxed. “I connect very well with my students, and I think that they respond very well to that,” he said.

English II Honors teacher and Assistant Principal Dickens was named the most by the students interviewed. The students had a lot to say about Dickens, mostly that he is an awesome teacher, students learn the most in his class, and that he commands respect.

“The best parts of my professional day are the ones I get to spend with the students,” Dickens said. “At the risk of sounding humble, I really don’t know why students chose me. If I had to volley an educated guess, I’d say it’s probably because I haven’t forgotten what it’s like to be a teenager and can relate to the students that I teach.”

    Joe Dickens prepares a lesson plan for his English II Honors classes.     (Photo By: Stephen Hammond)

Joe Dickens prepares a lesson plan for his English II Honors classes.
(Photo By: Stephen Hammond)

Dickens’ primary objective is to keep his students engaged. “I know if students are engaged and entertained, they will learn more. I never wanted to be a lame teacher who makes students take notes all class,” he said.

Dickens states that he truly loves being a teacher and misses teaching six English sections because he is now an administrator.

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2 Comments on “Certain SPS Teachers Stand Out to Their Students”

  1. Shannon Castle
    October 24, 2014 at 9:34 am #

    I think it is sad that such polls are conducted in a school.
    It is even sadder when none of the Brothers or Religion teachers were mentioned. There are so many great teachers at St. Paul’s. How must they feel when they read this kind of article.

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  2. The Paper Wolf
    October 24, 2014 at 10:37 am #

    Indeed, many SPS teachers were named by students as having a powerful impact on their academic careers, as Adam reported in his article, including Brothers and lay partners from all departments. All share in the Lasallian mission to educate and better the lives of the students entrusted to their care. The tone of this article is not intended to detract from the work of the other faculty members, merely highlight how teachers impact students by forming connections and relating to their students in a meaningful way.

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